Making Chicken Stock/Broth

Whether I cook a whole chicken or chicken pieces, I save the bones and skin and any liquid and make homemade chicken stock.  The other day I cooked a whole chicken in the roaster.  I used some of the meat for dinner that night and stripped the rest off the bones and froze it.  Then I put the bones and skin back in the roaster with what was left in the bottom of the roaster.  Covered with water and cooked on low for about 6 or more hours.  Then I strained out the bones and stuff and chilled the broth in the refrigerator overnight.  The next day, skim off the fat that hardens on top of the broth.

I used to freeze the broth, but since I got a pressure canner this year, I prefer to can the broth to keep in the pantry.  Bring the broth back to a boil.  Then pour into the jars and can according to your canners instructions.  I got 5 pints of broth from this time around.

You can add vegetables during the cooking time, carrots, celery, onions, whatever you like.  I generally keep my broth plain and simple and I also don’t add much salt.  But if you cooked a chicken and it had seasonings on it, that will give it a little more flavor.  If you only have a few bones you can save them in the freezer until you have a large pot full, then make your broth.  Do add the skins also.  After you have strained your broth, if it is watery tasting, just cook it down to condense it.

Having homemade chicken broth in the pantry is great to have around for things like rice cooked in broth, soups, casseroles, dog food.  I sometimes keep the hardened fat for using when I need a bit of grease for cooking.

Oct 26th, 2011
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